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Management

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Planning and executing a re-org

There isn’t a work conversation I have had recently with friends, peers, or former teammates across the industry that does not include a discussion of the higher than normal attrition rate companies are seeing. Anecdotally, every single friend of mine that works in tech and is able to change

Planning and executing a re-org
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Career pathing: five steps to building a clear career plan

One of the most frequent and rewarding conversations I have with designers across the industry is around career growth. Design is at a unique crossroads today. Companies are quickly realizing the value design can bring to the table. That realization is causing explosive growth in the demand for designers and

Career pathing: five steps to building a clear career plan
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Scaling design teams and design recruiting

One of the most challenging roles a design leader plays is scaling a team. The way you get to help shape the culture and execution of dozens or hundreds of people is one of the most rewarding things you can do. As part of that, one of the most important

Scaling design teams and design recruiting
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Your guide to resourcing discussions as a design manager

Budgeting and resourcing discussions are difficult conversations for most design managers. It’s hard for multiple reasons. First, nobody really prepares you for it. With engineering management, as an example, there is a need to have this resourcing conversation with the engineering team because their ability to deliver is critical

Your guide to resourcing discussions as a design manager
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Using a decision making framework: a deep dive into RAPID®

I’ve been thinking a lot about operational efficiency and how to build more efficient organizations lately. The velocity of decision making in an organization is at the core of how efficient that organization is overall. If you combine the velocity of decision making with the clarity and accountability required

Using a decision making framework: a deep dive into RAPID®
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The lonely leader and compassion fatigue

Over the years, a common theme I’ve seen leaders across the industry talk about is the phenomenon of the lonely leader. Most leaders I talk to either feel or have felt at some point in their career, especially early in leadership journey, that their experience as a leader is

The lonely leader and compassion fatigue
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Empathy at work

In design, we often call out empathy as one of the core skills a designer needs to have in order to deeply understand their customers and hands on users. To develop empathy, we spend hours with our customers in their environments to understand the pressures they’re under, the pain

Empathy at work
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The five elements to good management: ask, listen, take action, empower, and follow up

There isn’t one magic recipe for management. There are many of recipes. The challenge with giving advise to managers, especially in design, is the changing environment in which managers operate. Different environments require different styles of management at different times. Different people have different personalities and imposing a single

The five elements to good management: ask, listen, take action, empower, and follow up
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Building our product design career development framework

Note that this article focuses on our individual contributor career development framework. With a fast-growing team, building a robust career framework becomes a necessity. The goal of our framework is to facilitate ongoing conversations between a product designer and their manager about achievements, motivations, blockers/constraints, and development opportunities. These

Building our product design career development framework
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Building psychological safety into the core of a team’s culture

One of the most important aspects of any team is its culture. When teams grow, culture is generally a representation of what people believe the culture to be instead of what leadership might want the culture to be. For example, although the leadership team might want an open and inclusive

Building psychological safety into the core of a team’s culture